Sengakuji Temple

泉岳寺Sengakuji (泉岳寺), established in 1612, is a Soto Zen temple which is a 2-minute walk from Sengakuji Station of the Toei Asakusa Line or the Keikyu Line, which is one station north from Shinagawa Station.
This temple is famous for its graves of 47 samurai who avenged their lord's death in 1702. This incident was later fictionalized as Chushingura, which has been a very popular subject in the field of novels, plays, movies and the like in Japan. (Ask google if you want to know the plot.)

Chumon Gate
Sengakuji

Chumon was created in 1836. It literally means "the middle gate," and in fact WAS the middle gate, but the first gate is lost now so it's the first gate at present.

Sanmon Gate
Sengakuji
Sengakuji

Sanmon, the main entrance of the temple, was erected in 1832.

Hondo
Sengakuji
Sengakuji

Hondo, or the Main Hall, is post-war reconstruction. The previous Hondo was burnt down in WWII.

Kodo
泉岳寺

Kodo, literally meaning "auditorium", is a half-Japanese-half-Western building completed in 1925.

Graveyard of 47 samurai
Sengakuji
Sengakuji

This is the graveyard of 47 samurai (known as gishi or roshi) who avenged their lord's death in 1702.
The Gishi Festival is held to praise the 47 samurai in early April and on December 14 every year.


Tozenji Temple and Jokyoji Temple are not far from here.

Sengakuji Temple Official English website
2-11-1 Takanawa, Minato-ku, Tokyo MAP
Access: 1-min walk from Sengakuji Station of the Toei Asakusa Line or Keikyu Line